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Sussex Countian
  • Trayvon Martin rally held in Georgetown

  • About 50 demonstrators rallied in Georgetown on Saturday in memory of Trayvon Martin, a Florida teen shot and killed in February.


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  • About 50 demonstrators rallied in Georgetown on Saturday in memory of Trayvon Martin, a Florida teen shot and killed in February.
    The Delaware Justice Rally, held on the grounds of the Georgetown Presbyterian Church on North Bedford Street, was organized by Jeff and Angela Wyatt, pastors at the Restoration House of Judah in Ellendale.
    “None of us knew Trayvon personally, but what happened to him can happen to any of us or our children,” Jeff Wyatt said. “It’s not a black issue or a white issue, it’s a human issue.”
    Martin, a 17-year-old unarmed African-American teen, was killed Feb. 26 by George Zimmerman, a 28-year-old Hispanic community watch coordinator, while walking to his father’s home in a gated community in Sanford, Fla.
    Zimmerman has reportedly claimed the shooting was in self-defense. He has not been charged with any crime, as per Florida’s controversial “stand your ground” law, which permits the use of lethal force when there is a reasonable belief of a threat.
    The case has drawn considerable media attention and sparked hundreds of rallies across the country, including events in Dover on March 18 and in Milford on April 2.
    Several attendees at Saturday’s rally, many of whom wore hoodies like the one worn by Martin the night of the shooting, said they believe Zimmerman should be criminally charged in the slaying, which several called a clear case of racial profiling.
    “I came out here today because I think everyone needs to know what happened,” Georgetown resident Vandyke Ford said. “The system should be doing something about [George Zimmerman].”
    Milford resident Latisha Lewis, who sang “We Shall Overcome,” at the rally, said she brought her children to the event to help teach them the difference between right and wrong.
    “When you do wrong, there has to be consequences and justice has to be served,” she said. “It has nothing to do with color.”
    Many of those who spoke at the rally said they hope Martin’s death would serve as a wake up call to the nation.
    “There are laws in this land that many of us don’t know about and there are things that our kids are being subjected to that we don’t know about,” said Jane Hovington, a member of the Sussex County chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. “I encourage everyone here to go out and vote … and say to the people running for office, ‘Not my child.’”

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