Possum Point Players are inviting audiences to be their guests for two evenings of high notes and hijinx in “Brush Up Your Broadway.” The show opens Friday, Aug. 26, with killer  music and humor. Here are five things to know before you go.


Possum Point Players are inviting audiences to be their guests for two evenings of high notes and hijinx in “Brush Up Your Broadway.” This is the second time for the summer fundraiser, this time with more humor and fewer duets.

“I think it’s going to be a real fun, classy night to come on out and have some fun,” said Director John Hulse.

1 It’s a grand night for singing
When choosing songs for the revue, there were only two rules: No solos and no more than one number from each show. As a result, the show covers Broadway from the days of “Gypsy” and “Gigi” to more modern hits like 2009’s triple Tony-winner “Next to Normal” and the Dolly Parton-penned “9 to 5.” The 14 cast members perform in mostly duos, trios and small ensembles.

2 Send in the clowns
Hulse chose this year’s cast members for both their singing voices and their comic timing. Then he put them to work in humorous numbers like “A Little Priest” from “Sweeney Todd” and “You Could Drive a Person Crazy” from “Company.”
Performer Steve Givens said this year’s show has a lighter atmosphere than last year’s but with the same great level of music.
“This year’s emphasizes more fun, show-stopping types of tunes,” he said.

3 Music of the night
Hulse is jazzed about working with the night’s unsung heroes: Accompanist Gail Betton Kelso and the baby grand she’ll be playing. Milford Music Center is lending the group use of the piano for the production.

4 Luck be a lady
Audience members will get to bid on their favorite items during an auction before the show and during intermission. There also will be a chance to win raffle items.

5 There’s no business like show business
The business of the evening is two-fold: Entertaining and fundraising. As with many arts organizations, it seems tougher to meet budget every year, according to Hulse. Last year they decided to help themselves by staging a Broadway-themed fundraiser in August. At that point they thought it would be a one-time thing. Patrons loved it so much they asked for another helping, hence this year’s production.
“The court’s still out whether this will become an annual thing or two years in a row,” Hulse said.