This article was originally published on August 29, 2015. It was the the most viewed Bike Delaware article of 2015. “Comprehension of the familiar 'Share the Road' signage as a statement of bicyclists' roadway rights has been challenged, based on arguments that it is ambiguous, imprecise, frequently misinterpreted, and not designed for that purpose…In fact, […]

This article was originally published on August 29, 2015. It was the the most viewed Bike Delaware article of 2015.

“Comprehension of the familiar 'Share the Road' signage as a statement of bicyclists' roadway rights has been challenged, based on arguments that it is ambiguous, imprecise, frequently misinterpreted, and not designed for that purpose…In fact, the US state of Delaware discontinued use of the 'Share the Road' plaque in November, 2013.”

– From “Bicycles May Use Full Lane” Signage Communicates U.S. Roadway Rules and Increases Perception of Safety, North Carolina State University, August 28, 2015

In November of 2013, Delaware formally discontinued the use of the “Share The Road” sign, the first (and so far still the only) U.S. state to do so. The sign was interpreted in diametrically opposite ways by cyclists and motorists and failed to prevent conflict and hostility between motorists and cyclists. Arguably, the sign may actually have been causing conflict.

Now a study published on Friday by researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) has confirmed what Delaware already knew: “Share The Road” is a problem.

The authors of the new study – both NCSU faculty – surveyed nearly 2,000 people and found that there was “no statistically significant difference in responses between those who saw ‘Share the Road' signage and those who saw no signage” whatsoever in terms of their comprehension that cyclists are permitted in the center of the travel lane; that cyclists do not have to move right to allow motorists to pass within the same lane; or that motorists should wait for a break in traffic before passing in the adjacent lane.

In sharp contrast to the complete uselessness of “Share The Road”, survey respondents who were shown the “Bicycle May Use Full Lane” sign showed uniformly high understanding of permissible cyclist lane positioning and appropriate safe passing behavior for motorists.

Large study from North Carolina State University confirms that “Share The Road” is a problem.

It's been almost two years since Delaware discontinued any new installation of “Share The Road” signs. Perhaps this brand new study, with its unambiguous results, will now encourage some other states to finally follow Delaware's lead. Hey, heads up Washington and Minnesota…

@GOBuffalo @lilliealbert honestly, I had no idea what the purpose of the 'Share The Road' sign even was until right now. Not a biker.

— Jesse J. Anderson (@jessejanderson) September 10, 2015

@GOBuffalo in fact I'm retweeting it, because I'm getting mad just thinking about it. I know motorists have no clue what it means!

— underoo model (@haemish_smash) September 9, 2015

James Wilson is the executive director of Bike Delaware.

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'Bicycles May Use Full Lane' Signage Communicates U.S. Roadway Rules and Increases Perception of Safety

Why “Share The Road” Is Gone in Delaware

End 'Share The Road'

Goodbye 'Share The Road'

Here They Come (“Bicycles May Use Full Lane” signs in Newark)

Delaware Cyclist Ticketed for Riding His Bike Is Arraigned